#361 – Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings by Peggy Kruger-Tietz, Ph.D

Tietz_YSCP_7x10_no_crop///

Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings

by Peggy Kruger-Tietz, Ph.D

Rebecca Layton, illustrator

5 Stars

NEW! SHORTER REVIEW (click here)

Press Release:  Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings is an essential guidebook for adults in steering children through the different facets of emotions.  Each of the eight emotions is clearly defined through vignettes and illustrations, keeping both adult and child captivated this creating an opportune time for discussion.  By recognizing that all humans experience these emotions throughout their lives, the book provides a true sense of comfort.  The different ranges of emotions are not to be shunned but rather embraced and explained to provide a positive development environment for all children.

First Sentence:  Anger tells us when we’ve been mistreated so we can defend ourselves.

What the Book is About:  Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout is divided into eight emotion chapters:  anger, fear, shame, sadness, happiness, love, disgust, and surprise.  The author defines the emotion, gives an example through a short scene, and ends with actions one might take when feeling that emotion, then ends with things that might make you feel that emotion.  In a note to adults, the author explains why she wrote the book, the importance of emotions, and then some facts about emotions.

spread 2

What I Thought:  Where were these books when I worked with kids?  Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout is a well-constructed book on emotions, written so parents and children can understand eight common emotions.  I like the book.  I think it will be helpful for anyone who works with kids, as well as anyone interested in how humans process emotions as a child.  This is not an academic paper.  The guide is accessible, with clear language without any psychosocial theories or terms needing a dictionary to define.

The scenes are short and simple, and seen in kids’ daily lives on the playground and at home.  Children will have no difficulty understanding each scene.  The book uses four pages per emotion and an effective formula that can be broken down into five parts.

1.  (emotion) tells us . . .

2.  short scene using the emotion

3.  main character in the scene was (emotion).

4.  actions we might do when feeling (emotion).

5.  what might make you feel (emotion) and what you might do.

Let me use an example to explain how I came to these five parts of each section.  Using the first emotion explored—anger—to fill in the blanks.

1. Anger tells us when we’ve been mistreated so we can defend ourselves.

2. Maria is building a sandcastle when Kim grabs the shovel Maria is using.

7a“Stop it, Kim!” yelled Maria.  “I’m not finished!”

“But I need it,” said Kim.

“It’s not your turn! You’re not being fair!”” yelled Maria.

“I don’t care,” said Kim, and she ran over and knocked down Maria’s castle.

“NO!” screamed Maria.  She was furious.  “Why are you being so mean?” she asked Kim.  Maria’s face was red and her fists were tight.

7b3.  MARIA WAS ANGRY

4.  A large circle contains anger related words:  Yell and shout, glare and frown, stomp around, start a fight.

5.  Some things that might make you angry:

A. When you think someone is unfair – like grabbing the shovel you are using – stand up for yourself.

B.  When someone hurts you – a friend pincing your hand on purpose – get the strength to push the friend away to stop the pinching.

C.  When you cannot have something you want – like not getting to sleep over at a friend’s house – makes you speak-up when something is important to you.

Each of the eight emotions is explained using this same pattern.  I like this because the consistent manner helps kids understand complex subjects faster.  For younger kids, some of these emotions—or at least part of each section—will be difficult for them to comprehend.  Parents can then take this formula and apply it to any emotion that they need to explain to their child.

spread 1

Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout would be a great book for health studies and home schooling.  It can help kids understand themselves, their friends, and everyone they encounter, if only basically, but that is a start.  Older kids can sit down and go through the book, understanding the words and the meanings.  Younger kids will need adult help processing the information.  And young kids will need an audience of parents to play out their own emotion scenes, which I think they will begin to do as a way to process their feelings.  Emotions are easy to display but often difficult to process and understand.

I think Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings is a book that can guide kids in understanding basic human emotions.  Some things are easier to accept when one understands what has happened and why it might have happened.  Everything we do has an element of emotion.  Understanding is the key to better relationships and better lives.  Working through any of the listed emotions will give your child a roadmap for processing their feelings for the rest of their lives.

NEW! SHORTER REVIEW (click here)

//

Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings

by Peggy Kruger-Tietz, Ph.D    website    blog    facebook    twitter

Rebecca Layton, illustrator    website    blog    facebook    twitter

Released March 25, 2013

ISBN:  978-1480027862

40 pages

Ages: all

//

© 2013 by  Peggy Kruger-Tietz, used with permission.

Text:  Copyright © 2013 by  Peggy Kruger-Tietz

Illustrations:  Copyright © 2013 by  Rebecca Layton

//

//

DONATED TO LOCAL PUBLIC LIBRARY

//

//

yell d

13 thoughts on “#361 – Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings by Peggy Kruger-Tietz, Ph.D

  1. Pingback: Giveaway: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings | Free Fun in Austin

  2. Pingback: » Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings by Peggy Kruger Tietz, Ph.D. - Emily's Books

  3. Pingback: Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings by Peggy Kruger Tietz, Ph.D. | This Kid Reviews Books

  4. So glad I read this review, this really seems like a great book to help guide kids with their emotions – I’ll be sure to show this to my friends with younger kids.

    Like

  5. I have mixed emotions about this book! Do I want to dance around with delight or do I want to shout with glee? I guess they aren’t mixed at all, they’re all happy! Nice review, Sue!

    Like

    • I would have loved to have had this book to work through emotions with kids. With young kids you can use sand therapy but older kids are much tougher. Most of the time they have no idea how they are feeling. So, yes, a much needed book.

      Like

Comments are closed.